Become a PADI Divemaster | Thailand 2020

How to become a PADI Divemaster
Koh Tao

No matter where you want to go to do your DM course, here’s a quick guide on what it takes to get there!


If you still need a little push in the right direction, check out 10 of the best things about scuba diving!


Divemaster Prerequisites

Before you begin your PADI Divemaster Course, you’ll need to:

  • be 18 years old
  • have a doctor’s medical statement of fitness, signed within 12 months
  • be certified as a PADI Rescue Diver
  • have an Emergency First Response (or similar first aid) certification within 24 months – if you’re a medical professional, you’re sorted
  • have 40 logged dives
  • have at least 1 month to complete it (though I’d recommend taking 2+).

A lot of dive centres can work out a package price for you if you’ve still got a few courses or dives to get under your belt before you start.

If you book your DM Course here, you get to DIVE FOR FREE the whole way through! It’s the best way to gain experience and get your numbers up!


Where should you do your Divemaster course?

It’s a big world out there! Consider…

  • country, continent & culture
  • visa restrictions
  • living costs
  • political stability
  • local dive laws
  • weather & dive conditions
  • work opportunities
  • social lifestyle

What about the dive centre?

I’ve got experience with Simple Life Divers on Koh Tao, Thailand. I’m more than happy to answer any questions you have!

There are many dive centres & schools out there, and they all have different ratings. I’m still learning about these but if ‘5 Star’ is in the title, I think you’re in with a pretty safe bet!

Take into account…

  • customer reviews
  • certification numbers
  • DMT turnover
  • course, materials & fee costs
  • location
  • pool/boat facilities
  • accommodation
  • perks – free diving/future discounts

but most importantly…

  • will there be whale sharks!?


What’s in the PADI Divemaster Course?

The PADI Divemaster Course can be completed in as little as 3 weeks, though I would recommend taking around 3 months.

Becoming a Divemaster is a commitment. You’re dedicating your time, money & energy to developing your knowledge and skills to a professional standard. You’ll want to get the most out of every component of the course so that you can become the best possible version of yourself!

The main components…

  • Knowledge Reviews 1-7 in the Divemaster manual & Exam 1
  • Knowledge Reviews 8-9 & Exam 2
  • Learn how to use RDP tables and the eRDPml
  • Complete skills circuits and demonstration workshops
  • Map a dive site
  • Exercises in Search and Recovery & Deep Diving
  • Shadow Divemasters and Instructors as they teach courses and lead fun-divers
  • Present boat/dive briefings
  • Conduct a scuba review
  • Conduct diver rescue simulations
  • Complete the swim exercises:
    • 400m swim
    • 800m swim with mask, snorkel & fins – no use of arms
    • 100m tired diver tow in full scuba kit
    • 13 minute tread water + 2 minute tread with arms elevated

Fun-dive for free all the way through your DM course when you book with us!

Get in touch!


PADI Fees and Professional Dive Insurance

If you want work as a DM you will need to pay your PADI fees to achieve ‘active’ status. Check if this is included in your DM course cost.

Depending on where you are in the world, you might also need professional insurance. It is not compulsory in every country, but it’s a smart idea to have it incase anything goes wrong with you or your students.

If you are an EU citizen (the UK is still included at this time) I would recommend Aqua-Med for professional dive insurance. Check out their website for more information!

If you book your insurance through this link, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to yourself, and I would be very grateful for your support.

I only recommend products & services which I value and have used myself.



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